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Mini RTD Pt100 Three Wire Transmitter

These are the circuits and boards of a Mini Temperature Transmitter for a Platinum hundred ohms temperature Sensor. Has a 4-20mA sink output. Current Loop can be used for multiple instruments.

Mini RTD Pt-100 Three Wire Transmitter

The customer wanted a two wire system, this needs low power opamps which were ten times the price. If this transmitter works at 3mA it could have been two wire. Those parts were in short supply and the budget of customer was low. So i made it with regular opamps but three wire. The customer was satisfied as he got a cost effective solution. But now the situation of markets and products are different.

Mini RTD Pt-100 Three Wire Transmitter

If you need to transmit the temperature from a high voltage area or toxic environment. You will need to hermetically seal the transmitters, convert the Voltage to frequency, frequency to IR LED flashes or RF. This can be then remotely monitored. Then the transmitter has to be battery-solar operated, low power too. ICL7135 is a simple solution. It has a serial output that can be used to Drive IR Leds. Remotely sense these flashes in a Micro-controller and you have a reading. You may be able to use optic-fibers too. Where volatile liquids are present so that the risks of sparks can be eliminated.

RTD Mains Power Transmitter

This is the same Mini RTD Pt-100 Transmitter but in its case. Encapsulated in epoxy, hermetically sealed against harsh industrial environment. This will work well even near fumes of Ammonia with no corrosion. But not near vapors which can be ignited by sparking as terminals are still open. The side view shows zero and full scale ten turn bourns trimpots heads, for calibration. After cal it can be sealed with RTV compound.

Thermocouple Amplifier Standard

Thermocouple is the most common sensor in Industrial Temperature Measurement. The Signal Conditioning involves Cold Junction Compensation and High Gain DC Amplification. The output of a Themocouple is in millivolts.

The OP07 is a low offset 75uV opamp, here it is used to amplify the output of a Thermocouple, the gain of this stage is high. The zeners are to protect any high voltage at input zapping the opamp.

Thermocouple Amplifier Standard

The Resistor R6 limits the current. The zeners should be low leakage or use clamping pull-up and pull-down diodes to +5 and -5 respectively.

The RC low-pass filter formed by R6 and C2 reduce the mains hum or 50 Hz pickup of long thermocouple cables laid close to high current heater wiring. R1 is a offset null use or add if required. R11 is gain control of OP07. The TL072 is a FET input opamp used here as a summing amp.

Blind Dial Proportional Temperature Controller

Adding one more inverting amp with some gain to the output of this circuit can give you a 1-5V suitable for ADC or PC analog I/O cards. C1 also serves to filter, it is an integrator here. It suppresses EMI and RFI from motors, contacters etc., R13 sets an output value for 0mV input.

Simple Thermocouple Amplifier

The OP07 is in a non inverting amplifier so as not load the mV of thermocouple, the zeners are to protect circuit if junction contacts heaters or the earth gets broken.

Thermocouple and Pt-100 RTD

The RC is to filter out 50Hz pick up in thermocouple wires if near heater wiring and also reduces reading jumps when high current three phase contacter operates.

Simple Thermocouple Amplifier

The Pull-up 10M is when a Thermocouple breaks the output of circuit will be max. This is open sensor protection, in case Thermocouple breaks, Required only in industrial temperature controllers for protection. This means it will be 3.5V which should make you turn off the heater in software.

J and K Thermocouple with 4-20 mA

The other opamp is for further amplification as OP07 is set to around 30 gain and offset has to be adjusted with R9. If OP07 is kept in > 100 gain it may be difficult to adjust offset of 75uV. If you need very high gain in the first stage use some instrumentation amplifier or chopper stabilized amplifier. I am not very sure. This is the very basic Thermocouple Amplifier used as a front end signal conditioning in Process Control.

Using Thermocouple with DMM or DVM

In the circuit, use only metal film resistors (MFR) of 1 per cent tolerance, as this is an instrumentation application. Power supply should be a stable +5V, -5V supply, for which one can use 7805 and 7905 regulators.

The inputs TC+ and TC- terminals should go to a 4-way barrier terminal block, the 2 extra terminals are used to mount TH1 Cu thermistor. This forms an isothermal block, which is good enough.

A simple way to make a TH1 Cu thermistor, is to take a 1 Meg-ohm 2W resistor as a former and wind 2 meters of 46 SWG enameled copper (Cu) wire (5.91 ohm/meter) over it. This gives a 12-ohm value. Terminate wire ends on resistor leads.

Thermocouple Temperature using DPM or DMM

Test and Calibration –

For calibration, you will need a DMM-DPM and a milli-volt source (as shown in the Fig.). First connect source to terminals TC+ and TC-, then set source to 0.00 mV (verify with DMM for zero). The output across +out and -out (use DMM) terminals must be mV representing the room temperature (RT). For example, if RT is 30° C (use a glass thermometer) then +out should be 30mV at 0mV input. Adjust VR1 till 30mV is read at +out terminal. This is ‘zero cal’.

Linearizing Circuit for Thermocouples

This circuit changes the gain of opamp U1B in four steps or segments. It can be used to get a linear output from most transducers to 1% levels.U1A is a amplifying buffer use it to boost the signal to the required level.
Linearizing Circuit for Thermocouples

The resistor values i have put are for an imaginary transducer, you have to design them. The buffered input signal is compared to reference switching points by LM339.

Temperature Measurement and Control

LM339 changes the gain resistors of U1B thru the mux switch 4066. JP1 to JP4 can select either amplification or attenuation of signal. The resistor switched by 4066 can be across R1 or R2 based on JP1 to JP4.

You may have to input transducer values into a spreadsheet and draw a graph. Then divide the graph into 5 segments and deduce the switch points and gain.

AD590 based Temperature Sensor

Learn how to use the AD590 to measure environment temperatures for display, logging or cold junction compensation.

The voltage at the point 1 of R4 will be :Vo=( 1+ ( 10K/22K)) * Vref = 3.63V as nominal Vref is
2.5V.AD590 is a current source which gives 1 uA / kelvin, It is independent of the voltage across the device. you can treat it like a current source or sink or impedance. total voltage across AD590 is 5V as opamp pin 2 is at virtual ground.

Analog Circuits – OpAmp, Signal Condition, Mixed Signal.

AD590 based Temperature Sensor

This is the way you try to understand the design.

The AD590, here is a constant current sink as cathode goes to -5. The current it sucks away or drains from node pin 2 of OP07 is 1uA/ kelvin. at 0 deg C the current drained is 273 uA at 26 deg C it is 300uA.

You know according to theory that the amount of current entering the node, is equal to the amount of current leaving the node. do not look at voltages now, look at the currents. the AD590 drinks 273uA from Node pin 2 of OP07 at 0 deg C. Now no current can come from opamp OP07 pin 2 as resistance is in giga ohms and leakage in pico amps. now the pot R5 and resistor R4 are just in series and connected to 3.63 V as established earlier. The TL431 is a shunt regulator with reference and has a low impedence. Now the R5 + R4 combination should not load the TL431, that is not the case as 3.6 / 10K = 360uA .

By varying R5 pot you can pump 3.6 / 10K = 360uA down to 130uA when R5 is max into node pin 2 of OP07. This pot will be calibrated with AD590 in ICE to give a 0 mV output of the Op07. When calibrated R5+R4 pump 273 uA into node pin 2 of op07. this is sucked away by the AD590 which is draining 273uA at 0 deg C. This leaves the pin 2 at zero potential as currents leaving = currents entering.

Now to understand the opamp functioning.

The pin 2 of opamp is a 0 potential as calculated above and pin 3 also is at zero pulled down by R7. Now as both inputs are at same potential the output of opamp also is zero. The feedback resistors R1 and R2 will carry no current as both their ends are at 0. the Vout is now 0 mV and AD590 is on a block of ICE and opamp is stable.

If pin 2 (-) becomes more dominant or positive than pin 3 (+) the output swings negative. If pin 3 (+) becomes more dominant or positive than pin 2 (-) the output swings positive. The opamp on feedback tries to maintain both the inputs at the same potential. This thumb rule can be used to make opamp oscillate, amplify or compute.

Now what happens when the AD590 is removed from the block of ICE. It comes to room temperature say 26 deg C which means 300uA. Now the AD590 demands to draw 300uA from node pin 2 of OP07. The R4 + R5 from 3.6 V can give 273uA as it is fixed, not a uA more. The rest which is 300 – 273 = 27uA leads to a drop in potential at pin 2 and it turns negative. as demand is greater than supply. which makes pin 3 which is at zero more positive than pin 2. ( theory : 0 is positive compared to -1) as pin 3 is more dominant opamp swings positive as per thumb rule. and a current starts flowing thru R1 + R2 till the current reaches 27uA. at this point the extra current 27uA drawn by AD590 is supplied by opamp thru R1+R2. The Pin 2 now comes to 0 as currents leaving = currents entering.

Test & Measurement, Instrumentation

At this point the voltage at opamp output is given by ( R1 + R2 ) * 27uA = 270mV (assume R1+R2 is 10K after calibration) now opamp gives 10mV per deg C.as opamp now is a closed loop control the rise and fall in temperature, results in AD590 current variation which produces a proportional OP07 output.

Now the explanation above is in steps but all that happens in real time in an instant.

RTD 3-W Mains Power 4-20 mA Transmitter

This is the Photo of a RTD 3-W Mains Powered Temperature 4-20mA Transmitter. The Circuits and PCB are here

RTD PT100 Transmitter and Multiplexer.

From Soldermans Basic Electronics

Now with new Technologies like Zigbee and Modbus, We can classify Transmitters as shown below. The Measured Parameter Temperature, Flow or Events Has to reach an Intelligent Data Storage and Analysis System. It may just be an Human Operator who jots the data on a Notepad and Turns a Few Dials based on his Experience or an embedded controller. It could even be a Computer Network or a Web Application used by many, like Monitoring the Weather Attributes.

  • Analog Transmitters – Like 4-20mA Loop.
  • Electrically Isolated Analog Transmitters.
  • Transmitters that need to be Intrinsically Safe.
  • Digital Transmitters and Optical Interface.
  • Wireless Transmitters and TCP-IP.

The job of the transmitter is to take the weak analog measured parameter information from sensor, be close to it, amplify, clean, linearize the signal if required and send strong – error free data over a long distance to an operator or system.