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Digital 5V Power Supply using L296

This circuit is derived from an application note of L296, It is a Power Switching Regulator from ST. The advantage of using a switching regulator is that there is not much Heat Dissipation in this circuit.

Switching Battery Charger with L296 – del20031

Digital 5V Power Supply using L296

If you had to build the same with a series regulator, it would be very big due to external transistor and a huge heat sink. This circuit takes a small place on PCB, efficiency is high so power is saved and reliability of product improves, lastly the thermal gradients within the cabinet is avoided so that any form of drift or component specs variation can be avoided.

L296 and L296P are stepdown power switching regulators 4 A at a voltage variable from 5.1 V to 40 V.  External programmable limiting current. Soft start, remote inhibit, thermal protection, a reset output for microprocessors.

The Schottky rectifier BYW80 is used as it switches very fast 200V-20A-35nS. The Inductor and Capacitor is for the filter to get a ripple free DC from the Chopped DC output. There may be a small high frequency ripple riding on the DC signal of 5V in most SMPS circuits. So for very sensitive circuits use extra filters and shields.

The Current output is limited, and can be reduced further with a resistor from Pin 4 to ground. Also if the feedback to Pin 10 is thru a Voltage Divider then more voltage can be set at the output. See the datasheet and application notes for other design details and circuits.

5V -1A Power Supply using LM2575

A Power Transistor which is having a drop of 4 Volts across it and passing 3 amps thru it, may dissipate around 12 Watts of Heat, This is the problem in Series Regulators. While a Saturated Transistor or Mosfet with 1 Volts across and 3 Amps Thru will be just 3 Watts. But then a fully on transistor or mosfet cannot be controlled or regulated, for that we turn it ON and OFF very fast so that the right amount of current or voltage is delivered.

Power Electronic Circuits  

5V -1A Power Supply using LM2575

The way this is done is PWM – Pulse Width Modulation. In this the mosfet or transistor is switched ON-OFF at say 100 kHz, but the ON duration is varied to control the output. The longer the duration of ON time more energy or punch is transferred. Switching losses will be present depending on how fast the rise and fall times of the pulses are.

The Pulsed AC or Chopped DC can be smoothed to the Average with Inductors and Capacitors. The reactive pulses of the Inductor has to be absorbed by a Schottky Rectifier 1N5817 — 20V-1A fast switching diode with low switching losses.

This circuit is derived from an application note of LM2575, It is a Power Switching Regulator from National Semiconductor The details are here LM2575

Regulated High Voltage Power Supply

The Circuit below is a paper design and not tested. It can be used for education and information, this can help you make your own design. Please do not just wire it up and expect it to work.

Regulated High Voltage Power Supply

Now let me see if i can explain the circuit, This is a regulated AC power supply. This circuit uses the Mosfet to turn off when voltage goes beyond a reference point. That means it just chops the Sine wave above a point, that also implies that the output may not be pure sine and may have harmonics. The Transformer if well designed may smoothen the chops. Even a Series Inductor or Resonant Circuits may reduce harmonics.

The opto coupler 4N50 Provides isolation and good Current Transfer Ratio. That may mean you may not get a shock and that even a small current signal in Opto-LED will give a saturated or Low Impedance in Opto-Transistor. The Mosfet is used like a Impedance Control switch turned On-Off by Opto. The Optocoupler diode is controlled by the Opamps which work Closed loop. The transformer output is compared with reference to drive opto-led.

This Circuit is based on Teledyne Solid State data book application note. They may not be making these parts anymore but they are available from others.

Regulated High Voltage Power Supply – del20032

Single Polarity Power Supply

This circuit uses a PNP Power Transistor TIP2955, you can use any other according to your current and voltage requirement.

Look at R2 a 10 Ohm resistor, when the current in your load to the power supply is less than 70mA the voltage across R2 is less than 10E * 70mA = 700mV right. The base emitter junction of Q1 will be biased or turned on around 700mV, less than 700mV the transistor just does nothing.

Single Polarity Power Supply

When the current in your load goes over 70mA the voltage across R2 goes above 700mV and a small base current Ib flows from emitter to base of Q1 turning on the transistor. Now a collector current Ic flows from emitter to collector and then to your load supplying the excess demand. The Ic = Ib * hfe where hfe or beta is the DC gain value.

From my Power Electronic Circuits

Some transistors will have only AC gain specified which is lower than DC gain. TIP2955 has a gain of 20 so for an Ib of 50mA the Ic will be 1 Amp which saves the regulator from heating up or shutting down as the main current flows thru the transistor. Q1 should be provided with a good heatsink.