Inverting Amplifier – Op-Amp Circuits

Input Impedance of this module is Ri as pin 2 is at virtual ground, the opamp with feedback tries to maintain pin 2 and 3 at same potential pin 3 is at 0V hence pin 2 is at virtual ground. Clamping diodes protect OpAmp, Rf + Ri is between 5kE and 1ME as an opamp may be able to drive around say 5mA max.

Inverting Amplifier – Op-Amp Circuits

Current into node pin 2 = Vin/Ri if Vin is +ve it raises potential at pin 2, in order to bring it to 0V the OpAmp sucks away the current by turning its output negative the current leaving pin 2 node is also Vin/Ri. Then Vout is given by Vin/Ri * Rf as per V=IR ohms law. Most OpAmps output swings around 1v less than VCC/VDD for full swing use CA3130 this is a FET input OpAmp, and has low bias currents in pico amps.
Inverting Amplifier - Op-Amp Circuits

Vout = Vin * (-1) * (Rf/Ri)

Precision Amplifier with Digital Control

Non-Inverting Amplifier – Op-Amp Circuits

The input impedance of this module is very high, if U1 is OP07 it is in mega ohms, use CA3140 or LF356 fet input opamps to get 1 tera ohm input impedance, but for high gains OP07 is better as it is ultra low offset, this is a good amplifier for sensor outputs, as in a DC Circuit.

Non-Inverting Opamp Interactive Simulation

The zener diodes protect the opamp inputs, R1 limits current during high voltage inputs and R1 and C1 form a filter to remove ac components C1 should be a plastic type as ceramic and electrolytic caps are leaky. A large C1 will slow the response time, the sum of Ri + Rf should be greater than 5k so that output is not loaded. also do not connect output to voltages more than vcc/vdd it will blow Opamp.

The Spice in Analog Design

Non-Inverting Amplifier - Op-Amp Circuits

Vout = Vin * (Rf + Ri) / Ri

Related Reading

Noninverting Amplifier – Circuit Design Tutor

Simple Millivolt Source for Calibration

This is a modification of a mV Source that can be whipped up easily. You could use a DPM or Multimeter to read the output. The ability of this circuit to perform well depends on the quality of all the MFR resistors and the MultiTurn Pot. Use a Bourns 10T Pot.

Good Soldered Joints, Keep all Resistors and temperature sensitive parts from Transformer and Regulators. Keep Ripple in power supplies low, no EMI tolerated. If you have problems, make a Battery Powered Unit. Shield well in case you are in a Electrically Noisy environment.

Millivolt Source In this link see at bottom this circuit millivolt source, pdf.

I have put a better offset null, OP07 has around 75uV offset error which may show as +/- 1 count error on 4 1/2 DPM 19999 counts. You can skip it if you are using a 3 1/2 digit DPM as the error will not show, even it 4 1/2 it may be upto 2 counts only.

R9, P4 and R10 are for balance and offset as you said you can use it that way. (old circuit)

C7 can be a low leakage plastic cap, even a tantalum electrolytic is ok, aluminum electrolytic may cause a very small error.

Q1 can be any npn that can take 100mA current, do not use RF devices, 2N2222 is best.

If you use a DPM protect DPM inputs with clamping diodes or zeners or an error in bread-boarding may send +/- 12V to DPM and it may be damaged. Some DPMs come with protection like DMMs. use the circuit in del2003.pdf in analog section to make a 4 1/2 DPM.

Also in 2000mV range do not short outputs as the Q1 may get damaged, and in 200mV and 20mV range the output impedance is 10 ohms which is good for calibrating any high input impedance instrumentation like a process indicator etc. loading with 100K 10K will cause error. Most instruments are very high impedance so it is fine.

Analog PID control using OpAmps

The Measured Value and The Setpoint are two inputs to a Control System. The Measured Value is the Amplified input of a Transducer or Sensor for some Parameter that needs to be controlled. It could be Pressure or Temperature…etc.

The Setpoint is the User Defined Input using a Potentiometer, Thumbwheel, EPROM or Flash Value. This is the value at which the process has to be maintained for that parameter.

The difference of these two is the Error, this is the input for this PID Analog Computation Stage. The three Opamps are configured as Proportional, Integrator and Differentiator Amps.  The Addition or Summation of these Values is the PID Control Output.(These days it is Math in the Firmware on a MCU, DSP or Software Application in SCADA)

This Analog PID Control Output can now be translated to a 4-20 mA Control Signal, that means 0-100% of power to the Actuator, which could be a Heater, Pump, Fan, Motor using AC/DC Drives. It could be a Steam Valve, Pneumatic or Hydraulic Motorized/Solenoids. The Actuator Size/Array must be right for the Process, a tiny fan cannot cool a Large Furnace, a small solenoid valve cannot fill a Big Tank. An effective Proportional or PID  control depends on choosing or designing the Sensor, Actuator and System Environment prudently.  

The Auto Reset is needed to ensure the Integrator does not dampen the Process so much that it fails to even raise to the Process value fast enough (Diffrentiator). So in the Proportional Band the Integrator is Active.

If the Setpoint is 1000 deg C, the proportional band is 10%. The Raise of temperature till 950 deg is Undampended. After that Integrator is called in by the Window Comparator made of two opamps, the integrator prevents OverShoot, Undershoot, Ringing and Oscillations.

The PID control output can also be a Time Proportional Output like PWM. With a large cycle time of 20 or More seconds. Like 2 Seconds on and 18 Seconds off for 10% Control.Fast Cycle times may be needed for small systems with less inertia.

Industrial Process Control Circuits